Friday, September 09, 2005

Keep Your Cool

I want to pay some sincere homage to a great online personality by the name of "Charlie," who likes to talk about the "zen" of prepping. Charlie, I hope you know that you are able to inspire people, and your "zen" alone is worth immeasurable insight to those who pause long enough to sense its importance.

Zen - a simple word and concept. To me, at the core, it means getting into an energizing, calming zone difficult to match ... and when things are going well, impossible to disturb.

That's how I would interpret the zen of crisis readiness. I do love the term as it is applied to the avocation. As you settle into a calm, systematic process and rhythm of gathering your resources, one can almost shut out the many reasons out there for concern ... the things that can so easily create disabling anxiety if you allow them to.

Your Most Important Resource

Any "survival expert" worth his salt is going to agree that even if there is no other cause for hope in a threatening situation other than your ability to remain calm, then you do still have a decent chance of being OK. The flip side of that equation is that panic paralyzes and is the number one killer in a true crisis.

The good news is there for the taking ... the capability for calm is attainable by most anyone and it costs nothing. Sure, it might require some time and some mental discipline and even some focused practice, but there is really no better outcome to work toward or resource to develop in your preparedness activities than to become as in control of your emotions as you can be.

The simple message of the day--
Do not expect that you will be able to control your emotional tendencies and think clearly and logically in a life-threatening situation if you are unable to do so in your day-to-day life.

You have to be truthful with yourself about this. Are you able to maintain your cool in the face of even physical pain, social injustice, and/or mental abuse? Can you prevent someone from pushing your buttons no matter what? Are you the man or woman others look to when the tension is palpable?

If so, then you're probably going to do well if it ever comes down to the fact that your mental responsiveness and emotional resilience will determine whether you and your loved ones live or die.

If not, then the rest of your preparedness efforts are moot.

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